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Repopulating New Orleans

How did San Francisco do what a top economist says New
Orleans cannot?

Our latest Nobelist in economics, Thomas Schelling, offered the following advice in the wake of Hurricane Katrina: “There is no market solution to New Orleans. It is essentially a problem of coordinating expectations… .” By that he meant simply that each . . . → Read More: Repopulating New Orleans

When to Build What

This paper purports to solve a particular kind of problem that characterizes urban expansion and evolution: when replace a collection of individual apparatuses (CIA) with a mass system. Examples include replacing individual septic tanks by sewers, well to public water supply, private cars by mass transit, trash burners by public pickup, coal or fuel by line-distributed gas or electric power, . . . → Read More: When to Build What

A Tax Tool for Meeting Urban Fiscal Crisis

MOST OF OUR CENTRAL CITIES, as is now well known, are threatened by a vicious circle which is related to property taxation.
As buildings become older, they tend to become fiscal deficits requiring more in cost than they return in taxes. As the central cities age, the buildings become old and fiscal-deficit generators. This requires the central city to increase its . . . → Read More: A Tax Tool for Meeting Urban Fiscal Crisis

Irrigation Districts and Economic Development in the San Joaquin Valley of California: The Role of Land Taxation

The rapid growth of intensive irrigated agriculture in California is one of the more striking developmental achievements of modern tines. In 1870 California was noted for its cattle, wheat, and inordinate concentration o landholding. Today the highly developed farm areas of California look to the easterner more like gardens, and more like towns than countryside, so close are the homes, so . . . → Read More: Irrigation Districts and Economic Development in the San Joaquin Valley of California: The Role of Land Taxation