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How to Revitalize a Failing City

GEORGIST POLICY HAS been shown as a means to revive dying cities, and in the process to reconcile equity and efficiency, to reconcile supply side economics with taxation, and to reconcile capital formation with taxation of the rich. It can be seen as a means of harmonizing collectivism and individualism, in the most constructive possible ways. I know of no other . . . → Read More: How to Revitalize a Failing City

Changes in Land Policy: How Fundamental are They?

The last 25 years have witnessed a fundamental change in state and local land policy, reflecting a revolutionary change in attitudes towards immigration and growth. Local governments used to compete to attract people, now it seems to exclude them In the battle of boosters versus knockers, the knockers have won going away.
We have had low density policies with us always, but in . . . → Read More: Changes in Land Policy: How Fundamental are They?

Time, Taxes, Turnover and Intensity

A reply to comment by Henry Goldstein and Procter Thomson on my “Tax-induced Slow Turnover of Capital,” published in Western Economic J. WEJ editors returned it for shortening. Meantime Anthony Chisholm replied on my behalf, using some of this material. I have incorporated it into  to be polished . . . → Read More: Time, Taxes, Turnover and Intensity

Property Taxation and the Frequency of Urban Renewal

History has imposed a curious double standard on deliberations of tax alternatives. Most taxes are adopted because they raise revenue. Land taxes are rejected because they are no panacea. If they simply raise revenue without doing much damage they are a great improvement over what we have now. If they offer additional benefits, so much the better, but let us not . . . → Read More: Property Taxation and the Frequency of Urban Renewal

Containment Policies for Urban Sprawl

Why should we want to contain cities? Some agriculturalists regard the answer as too obvious to require demonstration: cities are dangerously seductive, sterile and wicked, and, like the Soviets, belong behind a Curzon Line and cordon sanitaire. The Soil Conservation Service entertains the Malthusians with endless excursions and alarums over dangerous inroads on our best cropland, and agricultural extension men rarely gather . . . → Read More: Containment Policies for Urban Sprawl

Urban Expansion – Will it Ever Stop?

This essay raises thought-provoking questions, contains many challenging details, and steps on some toes. It will arouse disagreement and maybe controversy. Everyone will do well to attend closely to the compelling problems it discusses of harnessing urban land—a resource that “holds economic forces of titanic power for welfare or destruction.”

“Urban Expansion — Will it Ever Stop?” Land, The 1958 Yearbook of . . . → Read More: Urban Expansion – Will it Ever Stop?